Beans (Ewa Oloyin)

Hey Guys!

Today, have decided to share my beans recipe with you all. Not a lot of people like beans for several different reasons and truth be told I fall into that category if its not cooked by me, my mum or a family member. But that’s how I am with a lot of foods. I am very picky and spoilt with who cooks my food.

However, I can assure you that if the right person cooks your beans, you would never turn it down again. When I was younger, my mum always made “ewa oloyin” for us on Saturdays. Ewa Oloyin is honey beans in Yoruba and it is different because it is sweeter than the other types of beans. In todays post, I share with you how I make mine and what I eat it with. Beans is not the prettiest to photograph, so I do hope I tried my best in making it pretty. Enjoy xx

IMG_8479

IMG_8480

IMG_8482

IMG_8485

IMG_8488

IMG_8490

IMG_8500

IMG_8507

IMG_8513

IMG_8518

IMG_8520

IMG_8531

IMG_8540

IMG_8544

IMG_8559

Ingredients;

1 cup beans

1 and half onions

2 knorr cubes

cooking spoon (beef stock)

palm oil (optional)

olive oil

1 & half tomatoes

1 ata rodo (scotch/habanero pepper)

1 ripe plantain (diced)

dry pepper (optional)

crayfish (optional)

Preparation;

Soak your beans in a bowl with water, for three to four hours (the water of the beans changes colour the more it soaks). You do not have to soak your beans, you can go ahead with cooking it straight away. I soak mine, to get rid of the gas elements. It’s a long wait, so you can either soak overnight or cook right away, eliminating the wash process.

Wash your beans at least three time and put in a pot filled with water. Slice half an onion and add into beans, add beef stock as well as knorr. Boil your beans for an hour or more, until it is very soft and mushy looking. While your beans is boiling, blend one onion, tomatoes and pepper together. Also dice your plantain. When your beans is soft, add in your diced plantain (it takes the plantain only about five – ten minutes to cook), so add it in after you are sure the beans is soft, as you don’t want the plantain mushy.

When your plantain is cooked, add in your tomato, onion and pepper blend. Close pot to simmer for about ten minutes. Add in your crayfish and dry pepper at this point if you are using those ingredients and stir together. Add in two tbs olive oil and one tsp palm oil. Let cook for an extra three minutes.

Serve beans while hot. You can serve with some bread, dodo (fried plantain), rice, or garri (cassava), as that is what it’s eaten with in Nigeria. Personally, I like to eat my beans with bread (agege bread to be precise) or fried plantains. I also like to sprinkle some garri on it. Beans is mostly eaten for Lunch in Nigeria.

Note: Agege bread is a special local bread baked in Nigeria. Looks like a normal loaf of bread, but for some reason it is so much nicer especially when hot. Growing up, my mum used to buy agege bread straight from the bakery in (Isa le eko) meaning downtown Lagos, the vendors there even know our car – that’s how much of dedicated customers we are. We bought it hot and fresh, straight out the oven as opposed to buying from the street vendors and this is because it is more hygienic. So yeah, if you ever decide to visit Lagos, look into the Agege bread factory in the heart of Tinubu. It’s never disappointing πŸ™‚

Cool point; did you know beans helps you grow in height? πŸ˜‰

Anyway, thanks for reading. Hope you find this recipe useful.

Follow on instagram for updates @wovenblends

Lots and Loads of love xoxo

5 Comments Add yours

  1. Folarin says:

    Omg!! I miss beans and plantain. I love what you’re doing here. Keep it up. Just seeing these Naija foods on your blog makes me feel like I’m home! lol

    Liked by 1 person

    1. wovenblends says:

      Thank you so much, I appreciate it. People like you keep me going ❀

      Like

  2. wakeel says:

    I also love wah yhu arr doing here..Mst people downgrad beans.Buh yhurs is different kip it up!!!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Nand says:

    why do my beans stay hard after boiling for 2 hours

    Like

    1. wovenblends says:

      what type of beans are you using?

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s